Days Gone By: October 11, 2018

The Meeker Herald

125 years ago

– The truck and other appliances appertaining to the fire department outfit recently purchased by the town council, was brought in from the railroad on Wednesday by E.M. Reed. The layout is from the Fire Extinguisher Manufacturing company of Chicago, and is a very substantial, handsome and complete affair in every particular. It cost $650 in Chicago, payable in two warrants, one payable this year and the other before the end of 1894. Freight from Chicago to Meeker, $240.33, making a total of $890.33.

The truck and accompanying fire extinguishers will form a piece of valuable town property which has been very much needed of late in the possession of which Meeker should feel justly proud. Our public-spirit mayor and town council made a good bargain for which they should receive the thanks of their fellow citizens.

– Notice is hereby given that bids for the building of a wagon road on the North Fork of the White River, from W. L. Wakeman’s place down the north side of the North Fork to the Big Beaver road, as surveyed, will be received by the Board of County Commissioners of Rio Blanco County until Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1893, at noon. Bids to be accompanied by a certified check for $25. For specifications and other particulars call at office of County Clerk, L.B. Walbridge.

The Meeker Herald

100 years ago

– Life is one long series of choosings. This way or that? Shall we do or leave undone. The questions fill every hour of every day, and by our wise or foolish answers we write our history.

– The influenza scourge has reached Meeker. So far it is in mild form, but the authorities—both town and county—met Wednesday and agreed to close all public places until the epidemic passes over, so the schools, churches, pictures shows, and even the Commercial club, were ordered closed. People are urged to keep to their homes, and only appear on the streets when absolutely necessary. Parents are requested to keep their children at home, as a necessary precaution.

The Meeker Herald

50 years ago

Forrest Nelson of Meeker, sheep breeder, was awarded a special plaque from the National Suufolk Sheep Association by the certification of his ram “Big Boy” under the new and rigid certification rules set up by the Suffolk Breeders Association in 1966.

Jim Ruckman, assistant fire chief, warned people who report fires to the dispatcher to remain on the phone long enough for the dispatcher to get the complete address. Allow him to question you if he needs to.

Your newspaper is one commodity that is never complete. It will never get all the news that it should, it will never satisfy all its readers, and it will never solve all the problems facing it. All newspaper editors are aware that they never quite do all the things they know how to do, or write all the things they should. But without exception, all the editors we have ever met do a conscientious job of trying to make their own community a better place to live in and to work in.

The Meeker Herald

25 years ago

A number of Ute Indians have been hard at work at the Thornburgh Battlegrounds site over the past couple of weeks. Nearing completion is a monument made of Utah shale which honors the Ute people.

Former Meekerite Mike Wallers was a happy hunter this year after downing a bull elk on Douglas Pass during the recently completed archery season. The animal scored 312 gross points and 298 net points in Pope and Young, and not surprisingly, won the Rocky Mountain Bowstrings “Big Bull Contest.”

Rangely Times

50 years ago

Was it any surprise to the people Rio Blanco County that tax dollars were given to Lynmar Tool Company? Was it any surprise when Lynmar went down the tubes taking with it $500,000 of Rio Blanco County tax dollars? I would like to know why the Rangely Times did not report on this very significant news item. Could it be because we are about to embark on the same adventure with the “supermarket project”?

Rangely Times

25 years ago

Residential neighborhoods begin a decline into slums when the people there become used to just a little bit of ugliness—a missing picket in a fence, a scar of bare dirt in a green lawn, a scrap of paper left tangled in a shrub. These things add up and multiply and spread. And they start with people. Here in Rangely we were handicapped from the start by the great number of “temporary residents,” people who knew they would only be here for a few weeks or months and consequently didn’t care how or where they lived.

Having read the letter to the editor in last week’s Times, I’m convinced that some people gripe just for the sake of griping. This was the most petty and disorganized complaint I have ever heard.

Miss Debbie Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Johnson of Rangely, reigned over 1969 Homecoming activities at Rangely High School.

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