Demand for energy growing

Dear Editor:
In all the recent energy discussions one thing is for certain: America’s demand for energy isn’t getting any smaller. In fact, API projects global petroleum demand will rise from 86 million barrels per day as of 2009 to more than 105 million barrels per day by 2030. All the while Colorado, Utah and Wyoming are sitting on the largest and highest quality oil shale deposits in the world.
Oil shale development could eventually lead to significant job creation and increased tax revenues. According to the BLM, 70 percent of these resources are on public land. Let’s use what’s in place—-it’s tax revenue after all. If we want to start chipping away at the deficit, there’s a way to start.
Sadly, Secretary Salazar and the Obama administration do not feel the same way. Last week the secretary announced the Department of the Interior would review past oil shale leasing and research policies in an attempt to further scale back oil shale research and development. When we need these potential jobs, need this energy and need this tax revenue, I have to wonder why the administration is making this development harder to achieve.
Cynthia Sullivan
Rifle

Demand for energy growingDear Editor:In all the recent energy discussions one thing is for certain: America’s demand for energy isn’t getting any smaller. In fact, API projects global petroleum demand will rise from 86 million barrels per day as of 2009 to more than 105 million barrels per day by 2030. All the while Colorado, Utah and Wyoming are sitting on the largest and highest quality oil shale deposits in the world.Oil shale development could eventually lead to significant job creation and increased tax revenues. According to the BLM, 70 percent of these resources are on public land. Let’s use what’s in place—-it’s tax revenue after all. If we want to start chipping away at the deficit, there’s a way to start.Sadly, Secretary Salazar and the Obama administration do not feel the same way. Last week the secretary announced the Department of the Interior would review past oil shale leasing and research policies in an attempt to further scale back oil shale research and development. When we need these potential jobs, need this energy and need this tax revenue, I have to wonder why the administration is making this development harder to achieve.Cynthia SullivanRifle