Letters to the Editor: February 19 Edition


Dear Editor,
My daughter recently brought home a letter from her class stating that her class wasn’t planning on having a Valentine’s party due to the short month but that “nutritional” snacks are optional and so are valentines.
The first thing that made me irritable is they don’t plan on having a party that day. She’s in kindergarten. She attends class for three hours a day, and they can’t spare one day to celebrate Valentine’s Day?
The next thing was the part about “nutritional” snacks. Now I’m all for healthy snacks any other time, but it’s a P-A-R-T-Y, and I for one want my daughter to participate and enjoy the simple pleasures of cookies and cupcakes for the sake of Valentine’s Day — if the school still recognizes it as Valentine’s, considering every other traditional holiday has taken on a name change such as “Pumpkin Party,” “Turkey Party,” or simply the “Holiday Party.”
What is wrong with this picture? Why should my child be cut short when it comes to celebrating our traditions fully? I remember being little and having so much fun at school during the holidays and actually feeling the school spirit around me. Now I feel they are just trying to be politically correct with all the children.
Bearing in mind my 5-year-old sits and watches CNN every morning with her cup of Joe trying to absorb all the political mayhem going on in the world. I think not.
Let the kids be kids. They have their whole lives to be adults and have moral issues thrown at them daily.
As for me, I plan on taking decorative valentines filled with candy to my daughter’s non-party, and I hope other parents do the same.
Lindsay Blankenship
Rangely

Dear Editor,
To be honest with myself, I really hate the idea of a stimulus “bailout.” I know I deserve a painless rescue. I know I deserve to win the Powerball. I also want my mother to pick up after me. But I wait. I wait. And I wait — and nothing happens. Darn it!
Bailouts just don’t happen at my house, in my town and in Rio Blanco County. When it comes to solving problems, “working” is better than waiting. Bailouts do not stimulate, they create a myth that help is on the way. The wait game begins. This delay discourages me because I convince myself (wrongfully) that control is outside of my hands.
The pioneer, the homesteader and rancher’s answer to hard times is action (work). Let’s call it a Rio Blanco “bail in.”
Joe Fennessy
Meeker

Dear Editor,
I would like to say thanks to John Urbanik for the write-up in a recent Herald Times. It’s great to be recognized for the positive changes being made at RDH.
Jack Rich
Rangely

Dear Editor,
Meeker is a “socio interesting community,” but a community at that. We, as a family, have, at times, been at odds with the community philosophy. Some of us were just not meant to live in a small town, where everyone knows your business, even if it is only speculation. However, Meeker as a whole is full of wonderful, genuine folks. Our life has taken us down many different roads and the wisdom that these roads offer comes full circle eventually. Keith had a wonderful opportunity to work with two of your local entrepreneurs this past year. Harry Watt is a gentleman and a scholar, don’t ever underestimate his intelligence. He is honest and forthright, two attributes you look for in any positive relationship. Melinda Parker is a character, honest and always looking to help your economy. We would just like to let this community know that we have very much enjoyed working with them and thank them and your town for such a positive experience.
Sincerely,
Keith and Kim Watson
Meeker