Memorial service for Stone Lee Martin: Tears in heaven

An enlarged photo of brother and sister Stone and Alahna Martin was the backdrop for last Friday’s memorial service for Stone in the auditorium at Meeker High School. Nearly every seat was taken as family and friends paid their respects. See additional photos, Jerry Martin’s eulogy for his grandson and Stone’s obituary on Pages 6 and 7.

EULOGY FOR STONE LEE MARTIN

An enlarged photo of brother and sister Stone and Alahna Martin was the backdrop for last Friday’s memorial service for Stone in the auditorium at Meeker High School. Nearly every seat was taken as family and friends paid their respects. See additional photos, Jerry Martin’s eulogy for his grandson and Stone’s obituary on Pages 6 and 7.Stone was one of the most loving, kind, compassionate, and genuine kids that has ever lived. Stone loved God, his family, his friends and the Meeker community. In his short life of almost 10 years, Stone taught us so much. Stone has also taught us many things in his death.
In the grave hours after the accident, when it became clear that Stone’s injuries were too severe for him to survive, his parents wanted to donate his organs so that others’ lives could be prolonged or enhanced. Unfortunately, some of Stone’s major organs were damaged to the point they could not be donated. However, enough of his bone marrow, eyes, skin, and heart were able to be used to improve the lives of others. What a fitting tribute to such a special and precious little boy who enjoyed life to the fullest.
In life, Stone received strength from God. The Sunday before the accident, Stone drew a picture for his dad and wrote across the top of it, “With God all things are possible” (Mark 10:27). Stone knew that “they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint” (Isaiah 40:31). As Stone drew strength from God in life, in Stone’s death someone will receive strength from his bone marrow. All of us should be reminded that “we can do all things through Christ who strengthens us” (Phil. 4:13).
In life, Stone’s eyes could see God. With inquisitive and grateful eyes, Stone saw God’s physical and spiritual creation. The reason Stone could see God so clearly is that he had singleness of his sight, which gave light to his whole being (Matthew 6:22). In death, Stone’s eyes will help another have sight. One of Stone’s favorite verses teaches us to let God’s word be a “lamp unto our feet and light unto our path” (Psalm 119:105).
In life, Stone demonstrated the touch of God’s compassionate hand. Stone knew that showing kindness to those around us is the same as showing kindness to Christ (Matthew 25:34-40). Like the Good Samaritan, Stone was always moved by the misfortune of others, and always used his precious little compassionate hands to help them (Luke 10:30-36). In death, Stone’s skin will help burn victims regain their sense of touch. Stone has taught us in life and in death to allow others to feel the touch of God through us.
In life, Stone had the heart of God. He loved God with all of his heart (Matthew 22:37). He loved his family, friends, and fellow man the way God loves. Stone had the heart of God because his heart was pure (Matthew 5:8). One of Stone’s favorite songs was, “Heaven is a Wonderful Place.” The reason Stone loved that song was because one of his favorite passages was “Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: For where you treasure is, there will you heart be also” (Matthew 6:20, 21). In death, Stone’s heart will renew the heart of another. Stone has taught us to have the heart of God and lay up our treasure in heaven so our heart will always be with God.
May we take the lessons Stone has taught us in his life and in his death, “And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you” (Ephesians 4:32).
— Jerry Martin,
Stone’s grandfather