MSD presentations offer looks at student life

Student Chevy Mohr, at podium, and industrial arts and technology teacher Zach Clatterbaugh presented two wood name-plate plaques, one for current MSD board members and one for past MSD board members. Clatterbaugh said Mohr designed and built the plaques, including engraving the metal plates. In the back row, from left, are current board members Dan Chinn, Mindy Burke, Bill deVergie, Marnell Bradfield, Bud Ridings, Kurt Blunt and Todd Shults.

Student Chevy Mohr, at podium, and industrial arts and technology teacher Zach Clatterbaugh presented two wood name-plate plaques, one for current MSD board members and one for past MSD board members. Clatterbaugh said Mohr designed and built the plaques, including engraving the metal plates. In the back row, from left, are current board members Dan Chinn, Mindy Burke, Bill deVergie, Marnell Bradfield, Bud Ridings, Kurt Blunt and Todd Shults.
Student Chevy Mohr, at podium, and industrial arts and technology teacher Zach Clatterbaugh presented two wood name-plate plaques, one for current MSD board members and one for past MSD board members. Clatterbaugh said Mohr designed and built the plaques, including engraving the metal plates. In the back row, from left, are current board members Dan Chinn, Mindy Burke, Bill deVergie, Marnell Bradfield, Bud Ridings, Kurt Blunt and Todd Shults.
MEEKER I Student presentations are common at Meeker School Board meetings, and the Feb. 4 meeting was no exception with the Meeker High School football players being recognized, Future Farmers of America (FFA) members who recently went to a national convention were introduced, and there was a safe driving presentation by Meeker Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA).
Meeker High School football players J.C. Henderson, Jake Phelan and T.J. Shelton were recognized for their all-conference team selections and Joe Newman, Tristan Pelloni, Raul Lopes and Willis Begaye were chosen to the honorable mention all-conference team. Activities and athletic director Brett Steinacher expressed how proud he was of the football team this year.
Two teams competed at the National FFA Convention & Expo and had the opportunity to visit Louisville, Ky., landmarks like the Louisville Slugger factory.
For her ability to select and evaluate livestock, Madi Shults was recognized with a gold emblem while Sam Baylie and Maclaine Shults earned silver and Ty Dunham earned bronze for individual livestock judging. The livestock team earned silver overall.
The FFA agricultural issues team made up of Kaylynn Dunham, Jamie McLaughlin, Brittany Smith, Tristan Nielson and Anna George earned a bronze emblem. To qualify for the National Agricultural Issues Forum, teams must design a presentation that addresses contemporary agricultural issues. The teams competed at local and state levels for the privilege of representing their state at the national convention.
”If you text you’re next,” was one of the sayings to remind students and parents not to drive while distracted. The Meeker chapter of the FCCLA will be presenting a red ribbon week presentation at the elementary school and other community events to remind people how dangerous distracted driving can be.
Shelby Burke and McKenna Kummer made the presentation to the board Tuesday night.
Student Chevy Mohr and industrial arts and technology teacher Zach Clatterbaugh presented two new wood plaques, one for current board members and one for past board members. Clatterbaugh said Mohr designed and built the plaques, including engraving the metal plates.
Teacher Chris Foreback reported on the Alternative School or the “Alt School” as students call it. Foreback is helped by John Strate, Scott Aldridge and many other teachers as needed. The purpose of the school is to proactively help at-risk students. Foreback said 50 to 60 percent of his students work outside of school and the school does its best to tailor curriculum to the unique needs of its students.
“Some days, we have breakthroughs and it makes the effort worthwhile,” Foreback said.
The Alternative School currently has 19 students. Foreback said he had six transitions to regular classes, two completed General Educational Development (GED) tests and he lost only one student this year.
Past Alternative School graduates have gone on to study automotive repair, welding, nursing, midwife school, truck driving, culinary arts, surveying and some have gone on to four-year colleges.
Foreback said the biggest factor toward seeing success lies with parental involvement.