CNCC ropes course completed

The ropes (or challenge) course has been built on the CNCC Rangely campus and the next step will be to train facilitators before the course will be used. CNCC plans to train 20 facilitators from both the college and the local community. Photo by Denise Wade
The ropes (or challenge) course has been built on the CNCC Rangely campus and the next step will be to train facilitators before the course will be used. CNCC plans to train 20 facilitators from both the college and the local community. Photo by Denise Wade

RANGELY I The finished attraction sits on top of Kennedy Drive waiting for activity. Rangely Dean of Instruction, Judy Allred explained, “A ropes (or challenge) course can be used for three basic purposes:  recreational, educational and therapeutic. CNCC will focus on using our ropes course for recreational and educational purposes. Participants are led through the elements with trained facilitators. The high course elements range from 30 to 40 feet off the ground and require participants to be harnessed for safety. Each time a group is taken on the course, there must be at least two trained facilitators running the activity.”
Allred focused on preparations for the course, “CNCC has funding to train up to 20 facilitators. We want to have trained facilitators from both the college and the local community. Facilitators must be willing to work the course on occasional weekends and in the evenings when the need arises. Facilitators must attend a 40-hour training session and commit to facilitating at least five events. With the onset of winter, training will have to be delayed until the spring. Training has been scheduled for April 14, 15, 21, and 22. The CNCC ropes course committee will begin accepting applications for facilitators within the next two weeks. If you are interested in becoming a facilitator, email your name, address and phone number to Judy.Allred@cncc.edu. An application will be mailed to you.”
Allred made course usage clear, “Priority for access to the ropes course will be CNCC students. However, there will be ample opportunity for community members, the local school district, clubs and organizations, and local businesses to schedule event dates. The CNCC community education program will also be offering non-credit classes to allow community members an opportunity to experience the course. Community groups and businesses will be able to schedule an event at a nominal charge per participant. Revenues generated will pay facilitator costs, maintenance and replacement of components for the course.”
Allred stated that, “CNCC will host the grand opening of the course in late April after facilitator training is complete. The grand opening will showcase the course with demonstrations of all the elements.” The showcase will also include a well-known community member posting a CNCC flag on top of the highest pole. Stay tuned in spring 2012, and plan to come out and watch fellow community members attempt the ‘Leap of Faith.’”