Days Gone By: Jan. 10, 2019

The Meeker Herald
125 years ago

– On Tuesday the new county officers stepped in and the old ones stepped out –the official metamorphosis taking place without ostentatious display or ceremony. Those two eminent members of “the ring.” Hay and Walbridge, succeed themselves as treasurer and clerk and recorder respectively; while, after an honorable service extending over three terms, or since the creation of Rio Blanco county, Arthur Criteblow gives way to Ambrose Oldland as commissioner from the first district. Dick Tovey, thank whom no better officer ever trod God’s green earth, turned the sheriff’s office over to E.P. Wilber, and Jim Lyttle, at the request of sixteen of our esteemed (?) fellow-citizens retired to make room in the county superintendent’s office for W.H. Young. The popular Jim Haynes steps into his old place in the assessor’s office, while J.D. Moug will fill the surveyor’s office for the ensuing two years. Under the new administration Stuart Edgar will be under sheriff, and in this connection we desire to pay a parting tribute to the efficiency of the retiring under sheriff, Sam Wear: He never went after a man but what he got him.

The Meeker Herald
100 years ago

– “I’m surprised to see a poet’s love letters sell as well as they do.” “Well you must remember that some people have never had any of their own.”

The Meeker Herald
50 years ago

– DeWayne Merriam, long time member of the Meeker Fire Department and an employee of A. Oldland & Co., was re-elected, by acclamation, chief of the department at the annual meeting Monday of this week. This will be his second 1-year term as fire chief. Other officers re-elected were Charles Holmes, secretary and Francis Sullivan, treasurer. Dean Parr was elected to the executive board, succeeding Frank Cooley.
– Final plans were made Tuesday for Meeker school children to participate in a dental health program in cooperation with the Dental Hygiene Department of Rangely College, in Rangely. Bob King, superintendent of the Meeker School, announced the program will get underway as of next week. Services to be provided to the school children participating will include: 1) oral prophylasis-cleaning the teeth and 2) patient education-correct diet, brushing, etc.
– The senior FFA boys took their annual trip to the Stock Show again this year. They left around 8:00 a.m. Sunday and stayed at the Colorado Hotel. Sunday night was free time for the boys. Boys attending was Jerry Oldland, Joe Merriam, Gary Ivie, Jere Taylor, David Mannel, John Eliasen, Elefar Garcia, Scott Mobley, and Larry Bellotti. Taking cars were Paul Starbuck and Mr. Ivie.

The Meeker Herald
25 years ago

– The 1994 National Western Stock Show Rodeo will offer a record jackpot of $425,475 when the dirt flies in the Denver Coliseum arena, Jan. 12-23. The prize money total tops the previous high of $410,295 paid out at the 1992 Denver rodeo. Reserved seat ticket prices for the 23 performances range from $7 to $14 and also include admission to the livestock show, exhibits and other special events.
– The Colorado State University Cooperative Extension office is conducting a training on the new system for applying for 4-H awards (replacing the National Report Form used by 4-H member 14 and older.) The training will be offered on Friday, January 14 at 10 am in the Extension office kitchen. The 4-H program nationally has converted to a new system, involving a resume, letter of application and a supporting portfolio.

Rangely Times
50 years ago

– Two thieves were picked up in Utah following alert work by Rio Blanco County Deputy Sheriff Bob Daniels on the night of Dec. 19. Daniels alerted Vernal authorities and described the crooks who fled from Rangely but were caught just east of Vernal. The two men, Ramon E. Ferre, 41, and Wayne Nash Murray, 28, both of Salt Lake City, Utah, were charged with robbing the Chevron Oil Co. here of a large quantity of mercury and stealing tools and a briefcase from the building at the Bureau of Reclamation power substation just east of Naples, Utah. Daniels was notified at 9:15 p.m. that a pickup had been seen near a Chevron meter house and two men observed running from the house. He expressed appreciation for the exceptional help and observation by Chevron employees in making the apprehension.
– “There is nothing so unequal as the equal treatment of unequals.” This statement by Dr. Hubert Wolfe of Colorado State University sums up the educational philosophy of the Rangely Middle School. With this as our motto, everything we attempt in this building is pointed towards the individual student. Anything we can do to improve learning conditions for each pupil in our charge will increase his ability to meet his own educational needs.

Rangely Times
25 years ago

– At a Special Meeting of the Rangely District Hospital Board, held on Tuesday, January 4th, the Board voted to accept the Proposal from MARCAL Construction of Rifle to construct an Addition to the hospital. As a result, the Board will enter into a Agreement with Marcal for the sum of $430,750. Forty-six percent of the addition will be funded by a Federal Grant of $200,000, with the remainder coming from the Hospital’s Capital Reserve Fund. No current operating revenue is being used to finance the project.
– The wind may be howling, the snows blinding and the temperature bitter, but don’t let that doe in your backyard gazing at you with her big brown eyes-tug at your heart strings. She doesn’t need you to toss her an apple or grain. “People may mean well when they feed the wildlife, but doing so generally does more harm than good,” said Rick Kahn, a biologist for the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The Division urged people to refrain from feeding wildlife even though they think they may be helping the animals endure winter. “What many people may not realize is that feeding big game animals is against the law in Colorado, and there are good reasons why,” said Kahn.