DAYS GONE BY: September 9

 The Meeker Herald

125 years ago

• Monday was Labor Day and it was duly observed in Meeker by the local branch of the Ancient Order of Sons of Rest, who always celebrate this day in a becoming manner.

• Wednesday night’s rain storm caused another rise in Sulphur creek, and swept out the flume which carries the town ditch water across the former.

The Meeker Herald

100 years ago

• Judge Gordon’s new residence, on the corner of Garfield and Sixth street, is now well underway. Emert Van Cleave is the master mechanic in charge.

• Another old landmark is disappearing this week. It is the old Bergh blacksmith shop, which has been abandoned for many years. Situated at the northeast corner of Sixth and Market streets, the old frame building was used by the Hugus Company for over 20 years as an excess machinery warehouse. Thus the old landmarks disappear and make room for the onward march of improvement. 

The Meeker Herald 

50 years ago

• Several Rio Blanco County youth competed and won honors at the Garfield County Junior Rodeo in Rifle last weekend, with Kirk Norell of Meeker winning the All-Around Cowboy award.

• The long-awaited hanging of the “Valley Curtain” north of Rifle has been delayed another three weeks, was the latest word received last week. Artist Christo said about two weeks ago he hoped to have the curtain up by Labor Day.

The Meeker Herald 

25 years ago

• Kathy Knox and her dog, Bob, posted a score of 119 to win the 1996 Meeker Classic Sheepdog Championship.

• I want to tell everyone that all the hard work and expense that has been put into the restoration of the old Garrison Building in Meeker is paying off. The building is now slowly being lowered onto a new treated lumber foundation. The “Garrison” was built of cottonwood logs in 1880 to house cavalry officers for the military camp.

Rangely Times 

50 years ago

• The Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep relocated in the Little Hills research station on Piceance Creek are responding well to a new drug for lung worms. The animals were formerly in Glenwood Canyon.

• It was estimated by the Ken R. White Co. that the resident population of Rangely would increase to about 6,000 persons by 1985 and the Master Plan adopted allowed for additional open space, education facilities, and other social services for the predicted population.

Rangely Times 

25 years ago

• The Sept. 10 meeting of the Rangely Board of Trustees started out as a sounding board for the pros and cons of wild horse management in Rio Blanco County. All of the Trustees were in attendance, listening as citizens gave voice to their feelings about the controversial issue.