Rangely Museum opens this Friday

Rangely town officials were on hand for the Sept. 15 dedication of the Raven A1 pump jack, moved to the Rangely Outdoor Museum, including Town Manager Peter Brixius, Rangely Mayor Frank Huitt and Town Crew Supervisor Mike Englert as well as Chevron Technical Team Advisor Erik Woodward, Museum Director Brenda Hopson, Museum Board members Sharon Brown, President Cheryl Robertson, Naomi LeGere, Secretary Gaila Bell, Chevron Operations Supervisor Luke Allred, Museum Board members Dorothy and Tommy Collins and Chevron Policy, Government and Public Affairs field representative Cary Baird.

Rangely town officials were on hand for the Sept. 15 dedication of the Raven A1 pump jack, moved to the Rangely Outdoor Museum, including Town Manager Peter Brixius, Rangely Mayor Frank Huitt and Town Crew Supervisor Mike Englert as well as Chevron Technical Team Advisor Erik Woodward, Museum Director Brenda Hopson, Museum Board members Sharon Brown, President Cheryl Robertson, Naomi LeGere, Secretary Gaila Bell, Chevron Operations Supervisor Luke Allred, Museum Board members Dorothy and Tommy Collins and Chevron Policy, Government and Public Affairs field representative Cary Baird.
Rangely town officials were on hand for the Sept. 15 dedication of the Raven A1 pump jack, moved to the Rangely Outdoor Museum, including Town Manager Peter Brixius, Rangely Mayor Frank Huitt and Town Crew Supervisor Mike Englert as well as Chevron Technical Team Advisor Erik Woodward, Museum Director Brenda Hopson, Museum Board members Sharon Brown, President Cheryl Robertson, Naomi LeGere, Secretary Gaila Bell, Chevron Operations Supervisor Luke Allred, Museum Board members Dorothy and Tommy Collins and Chevron Policy, Government and Public Affairs field representative Cary Baird.
RANGELY I Rangely Museum opens its 2016 season Friday, May 6, and organizers are hosting an open house during the weekend that includes refreshments for those who stop by to see the recently installed Raven A1 Pump Jack.

The museum is open Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. to kick off the season. Board members will be on hand to talk about plans for the year and the future. The museum will continue with these weekend-only hours through May.
From June through August, the museum opens Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.
For September and October, the museum returns to the weekend-only schedule.
The museum is located at 200 Kennedy Dr. in Rangely.
Rangely Oil Field History is passionately preserved by the incredible efforts of Chevron, Alliance Energy, the Town of Rangely, Colorado Northwestern Community College, Rio Blanco County and the Rangely Outdoor Museum.
This past fall, Chevron USA generously donated the local Raven A1 Pump Jack to the Rangely Outdoor Museum.
Thanks to the efforts of all involved in getting it to its new home, a dedication ceremony was offered and rewarded all attendees with memories abounding.
On Sept. 15, 2015, Luke Allred, Chevron operation supervisor, Erik Woodward, Chevron technical team leader from Midland, Texas, and Cary Baird, policy, government and public affairs field representative from Chevron, were all special guests at the Outdoor Museum.
An indoor celebration regaled attendees with stories that made some smile and some tear up. The effect the oil industry has on this small town was evident in the ceremonies.
Peter Brixius, Rangely town manager, was also honored for coordinating the relocation of the Raven A1 Pump Jack with the help of many town and Alliance Energy employees.
Raven A1’s history in the area is dense. In 1931 while the rig was being built and living quarters established, Cheryl Robertson’s mother Ruby Rector Kirby and grandmother Myrtle Rector boarded the superintendent Jack Stewart and his wife, along with 32 crew members from the California Oil Company at the Brick Ranch located four miles West of Rangely.
This was the Raven A1 well. From that date on, the rest of the story is Chevron History.
The museum is currently recording these stories via audio files so visitors can get a first hand account of its many moves and legendary lore.
It took many hours of hard labor and much money to get the pump jack to its new home. Many thanks to all those involved.