Rangely Elks Club seeks help with plan to renovate trap, skeet ranges

A $47,000 Colorado Parks and Wildlife grant will help fund a renovation of Rangely Elks Club’s trap and skeet range this fall. The Elks Club is seeking local in-kind contributions to meet grant requirements and will outline current needs during an open house at the trap range at 6 p.m. on Friday.

A $47,000 Colorado Parks and Wildlife grant will help fund a renovation of Rangely Elks Club’s trap and skeet range this fall. The Elks Club is seeking local in-kind contributions to meet grant requirements and will outline current needs during an open house at the trap range at 6 p.m. on Friday.
A $47,000 Colorado Parks and Wildlife grant will help fund a renovation of Rangely Elks Club’s trap and skeet range this fall. The Elks Club is seeking local in-kind contributions to meet grant requirements and will outline current needs during an open house at the trap range at 6 p.m. on Friday.
RANGELY I With the help of a Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) grant, the Elks Club Trap Range will undergo a major facelift scheduled for completion late this fall.

A $47,000 grant from the CPW to revitalize Rangely’s dilapidated trap/skeet range must be used within one year, said Elks Club member Rick Brady, one of the project’s leaders. At least $15,000 of that funding must be in-kind work contributed by local business owners and residents.
W.C. “Bud” Striegel, Moon Lake Electric Co., Ducey’s Electric, NAPA Auto Parts, Stewart Welding and Rocky Mountain Weed Management are among local businesses contributing to the project to date.
Brady said the Elks Club is still seeking individuals and businesses to help with welding, brick-laying, carpentry, plumbing and electrical work.
“We need to show Colorado Parks and Wildlife that the Elks and the folks of Rangely want to be involved in this and make sure this happens,” Brady said.
A revitalized trap/skeet range, he said, will provide a substantial economic benefit to the town and county while allowing youth and seasoned shooters to hone their skills in a fully functional setting.
None of that happens, he added, without community buy-in and support.
Installing and securing a two-inch water line from a nearby water tank to the clubhouse on Dragon Road is a priority, Brady said. Other slated projects include making key upgrades to the clubhouse itself and to two existing trap houses, along with building two new skeet houses that will enable both skeet and trap shooters to practice simultaneously at the range.
The Elks Club also plans to repair, replace or add key machinery in the trap and skeet houses.
“Right now, we have two semi-functional trap shooting machines,” Brady said. “The third one is what they call a wobble machine, and it’s in dire need of repair. So when we are done with this project, we will have two brand-new machines in the trap houses, and we will have two new machines in the skeet houses.”
The Elks Club will host an open house at the trap range Friday at 6 p.m. to outline project needs for trap and skeet users and others willing to contribute materials or labor.
“We want the residents of Rangely to understand what we’re doing and know that we appreciate any help, offers or guidance,” Brady said. “People will hear about the plan, including a list of projects to pursue and a timeline these need to be done within.”